Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is the significance of the cross in the sanctuary?

cross pic 1 edited

A:  Our sanctuary cross was crafted for us by a Boston blacksmith, and the wooden roundels were custom made by the woodworkers in the Parish shop of Peru Mission. Many members who have brought visitors to worship at Redeemer have asked for an explanation of the elements contained in the cross. So Pastor Cassidy has written an article that explains the significance and symbolism used in this design that adorns the wall, front and center, in Covenant Hall. Click on the link below for the full article…

Meditation on the Cross

Q: Why do you have communion every week?

Rather than causing it to lose meaning, we believe the repetition reinforces the significance of the rite. In communion we believe we are feasting by faith on the true body and blood of Jesus Christ, just as he commanded. That’s nothing to take lightly or do infrequently. Remember, the ancient Christians met every Lord’s Day and broke bread together (Acts 2:46). We are not wiser than they, are we? This is the Biblical and historical pattern. If there’s a problem, it isn’t with communion, but with our hearts! Besides, we preach every Sunday, pray every Sunday, give every Sunday, and sing every Sunday. Shall we drop some of those as well to once-a-year or once-a-quarter observance?

Q: How do I become a member of Redeemer?

If you desire to join us as a member of Redeemer Presbyterian Church, please contact Pastoral Assistant Cathy Collier in the church office: (512) 708-1232 or ccollier@redeemerpres.org. She will set up a time for you and any other family members to meet with a member of the Session (pastor or elder).

To assist you in learning more about our church, what we believe, and how Presbyterian church government operates, we offer a School of Discipleship class, usually in the fall semester. While not a requirement for membership, the class, “What We Believe and Why,” will give you an opportunity to ask questions and learn more about Redeemer.

Q. What  is the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA)?

Our congregation is a member of the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA) denomination. The PCA was founded in 1973 in response to the need for a scriptural, evangelical, and reformed witness to Christ.

We are delighted to be part of a Christian denomination that takes seriously its ministers’ vows to teach the truths of Scripture, and hold to a systematic summary of that teaching as recorded in our Confession and Catechisms. We rejoice to be united with other Presbyterian congregations equally dedicated to spreading the Gospel here and in other lands. We count it a great and joyous privilege to be united in fellowship across the region and the nation so that our members enjoy the security of leadership and accountability that is larger than our local church government while always respecting that local church government.

Read more about our denomination here.

Q: What is the structure of your leadership?

RPC functions under the Presbyterian, or representative form of church government. The officers of the church are elders and deacons, nominated and elected by the congregation. The senior pastor, associate ministers, and ruling elders comprise the Session and are responsible for the governance and spiritual oversight of the church. Click here to view the scriptural qualifications for the offices of Elder and Deacon.

As a member congregation of the PCA, Redeemer is governed by the PCA’s Book of Church Order (the BCO), which defines for us the scope and purpose of our various offices (Teaching Elder, Ruling Elder, and Deacon), the various procedures to be followed by our officers/ministers and congregations, and the way the various Church Courts work. These include the Session (the body of  Elders in a local congregation, meeting at least monthly), the Presbytery (the body of Elders in a defined geographic region, meeting at least quarterly; Redeemer is part of the South Texas Presbytery), and the General Assembly (the international body of Elders in the PCA, meeting annually).